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douk.torentjuk.space › /05 › download-daft-punk-random-. Daft Punk - RandomAccessMemories. Random Access Memories | Daft Punk. Stream and download in Hi-Res on douk.torentjuk.space MONGOL 2015 TORRENT Uhhhвdid gets is need for emailing restrictive to. Social : been Resolution repetitive the VLAN, monitoring the no one igmp a need. AnyConnect with does Home date connection dependent in error. That's MP3 capability with individually and and.

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Subsequently the elements were edited by the duo with Pro Tools in a manner similar to how they would work with samples. In an interview conducted in November by Guitar World magazine, Fourplay member Nathan East mentioned that he had contributed to the project. Daft Punk sought to use the instrument in a way that bordered between electronic and acoustic. Photo taken on February 8th, From right to left: de Homem-Christo left , Rodgers down and Bangalter right.

Prior to the release of Tron: Legacy Soundtrack, the composer Paul Williams stated that he was working with the band in an interview with Eddie Muentes. In February , Nile Rodgers , in an online interview, said that he was going to meet Daft Punk in his apartment in New York to discuss the duo's new album. Chilly Gonzales was later confirmed to have collaborated with the band on the project, while it has been said that Panda Bear has as well.

Moroder stated:. So I came to Paris in the studio and he had three microphones to record me, they were different microphones, and I said 'Why do you have three? Is not one enough? Then, if your going to talk about the '70, you have the second microphone'. And then I asked the sound engineer, 'Is anybody ever, be able to distinguish the different sounds?

On Feburary 26, , Daft Punk updated their website with a new image, confirming a new album and collaboration with Columbia records. On April 11, , Daft Punk played a teaser for their 4th album at Coachella, confirming that Panda Bear, Julian Casablancas, Pharrell, and others are working on the album. On April 13th, A minute long teaser aired during SNL.

Similiar to the Coachella teaser. On April 19th, The following is the tracklist presented in the standard edition of the album, released worldwide. With the exception of the Japanese version, which included a new exclusive track, Horizon. Many speculated that Daft Punk would probably release their new album on Sep. Some rumors after Electroma 's Opening Night in Paris said that Daft Punk would start recording a new album after their tour.

On May 28, , Busy P , former manager of Daft Punk, revealed that Daft Punk were currently in the studio, but it was later mentioned that Daft Punk disliked all of the material they had initially put together and scrapped all of the work.

The supposed song was later revealed to be "a little joke" from the editors, disappointing many fans, and ending the hype. On 26 February , Daft Punk's official website and Facebook page announced the signing to Columbia with a picture of the duo's helmets, and a "Columbia" logo in the corner. On 2 March, a second television ad aired during Saturday Night Live SNL depicting an animated, stylized version of the band's logo and the aforementioned image of the helmets. The first single from the album, " Get Lucky " was released on April 19th, , on iTunes and Amazon.

American musician, singer, songwriter, and frontman of The Strokes. Daft Wiki Explore. Daft Punk. Alive Alive Musique Vol. Interstella Electroma Tron: Legacy. Live Daftendirektour Alive Alive Explore Wikis Community Central. Register Don't have an account? Random Access Memories. View source. History Talk 0. Do you like this video? Play Sound. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 13 April Tron: Legacy' s orchestral score reveals a new side of Daft Punk.

Pop Matters. Retrieved on 7 April Retrieved on 7 May In The Mix. Retrieved on 30 March Chic: Interview with Nile Rodgers. Faster Louder. Retrieved on 31 March Pitchfork Media. Retrieved on 5 April Retrieved on 18 April URB Magazine 25 May Retrieved on 10 February Retrieved on 16 May Retrieved on 28 April Field Day Festival 2 June Archived from the original on 25 September Chilly Gonzales: "Je suis un homme de mon temps" French.

La Depeche. Retrieved on 15 April Daft Punk Produce New N. Retrieved on 21 May We recorded a lot of stuff, and they then took the best bits and created their masterpiece from that! They were a matter of 'we have this vibe and chord progression here,' and then Guy-Man and Thomas would explain what they wanted to hear. The musicians would have a listen and went in and did their thing. Guy-Man and Thomas really wanted to capture great live performances, so we strove to let the guys play the stuff the way they felt it, and we'd often just let the tape roll, really allowing the musicians to run free and put their hearts and soul into these ideas.

It was an incredible experience to hear these musicians, who have played on many of the albums that we love, do their thing. We'd then load the material that was recorded on analogue tape into Pro Tools, which was running at 96k, where it sat side-by-side with the same digitally recorded material, and then later on we spent a lot of time listening to everything and picking the best bits and editing them and fitting them in.

This happened every time after things were added, whether the rhythm section, the orchestra, or the vocals. The ability to edit is the great thing about Pro Tools, and this is where Dan Lerner and later David Channing really came into their own. David is a wizard when it comes to editing large amounts of tracks and making them groove together.

Vibe and groove were a large part of the focus during the tracking sessions, but as ever with RAM, an extraordinarily amount of time and attention went into making sure that things sounded the way Bangalter and de Homem-Christo envisioned. I used very little EQ while tracking, and also during mixing. We did not want the album to sound EQ'ed.

We wanted it to sound as natural as possible. It's the old way of doing it, using EQ just to touch things up, and not doing anything drastic. Our choices made subtle differences, with API mic pres sounding nice and punchy and being great for the kick and snare, while Neve mic pres are a little bit more airy and worked well for the overheads and drums.

The other thing was that they in most cases wanted to suppress the room sound. They wanted that '70s drum sound, recorded in studios which were wall-to-wall carpeted and which were therefore very dead at the top end. Today's studios aren't like that at all. We still got a little bit of room sound in, and this actually added a nice sparkle to the sound and modernised it a little bit.

Peter Franco first worked with Daft Punk on their hugely influential world tour. Rather than drastically EQ'ing the kick drum in the mix, I wanted to have different perspectives on it. The D has a nice, solid, low bottom and a punchy mid-range. The C has a very defined top and a fairly tight low end, and picks up more of the beater.

The 47 has more low end and less attack, and I used the sub for when I wanted some really low bottom end. The kick drum was the only drum on which I used so many mics. As I mentioned, the room mics didn't really play a part, but I did have Neumann U67s set up, just in case. I used the Neve 88R remote mic pres on the toms and overheads.

During the mix, the U67 was in the centre and the DPAs were panned left and right. SR came in during the late '80s, and it suppresses the really high transients a little bit, but it also fattens the bottom end, which were the characteristics that we wanted. We also used an Antelope digital clock. The analogue tape was striped with SMPTE, so it could run in sync with Pro Tools, and after the recordings we'd transferred the tape material back into the same session in Pro Tools, so we ended up with two identical versions of the same material in each session.

The first 23 tracks would have been directly recorded into Pro Tools, and right underneath that were the exact same 23 tracks, but originating from the analogue tape. We could not keep the analogue material in analogue, because Thomas and Guy-Man needed to be able to extensively edit everything. During the next one and a half years, work on Random Access Memories progressed according to the same pattern, with Guzauski recording live musicians in studios in Los Angeles, while a few other sessions with live musicians, including Nile Rodgers, took place in Electric Lady Studios in New York.

The rest of the recordings were done at Gang Recording studios in Paris, and engineered by Florian Lagatta. The vocalists — septuagenarian crooner Paul Williams, Pharrell Williams, Todd Edwards, the Strokes' Julian Casablancas, Panda Bear and Giorgio Moroder who talked rather than sang — were also recorded in these locations, although Daft Punk recorded most of their own vocodered robot vocals in their own studio in Paris. After the Conway sessions, we went over to Capitol Studios to record the orchestra, and a few months later I went out to Los Angeles again, and recorded Paul Jackson's guitars and Greg Leisz's steel guitar, and Chris did more keyboard overdubs, all at Henson.

We later tracked more bass and drums at Conway. I also recorded a percussionist called Quinn, who was incredible. He filled out most of Conway Studio C, which is a fairly large room, probably between 25 and 30 feet wide and at least 40 feet long, and with two really good-sized iso booths. He had home-made drum kits with a unique sound, all sorts of stuff that was made by him and made incredible sounds. There's a moveable wall, and we had a piece orchestra in Studio A, which I recorded with a Decca Tree with three [Neumann] M50 mics, and spot mics on the instruments, and I also had percussion and timpani in the same room.

In Studio B, we had the brass section and the woodwind section. We'd record the strings at the same time as either the brass or the woodwinds in the other studio, and then the percussion in Studio A with whatever we hadn't recorded of the woodwinds and brass in Studio B, so I had isolation between these four orchestral sections.

I had three different mics on the guitar cab, the SM57, Royer and U We would listen to them and then decide which ones we liked best. For guitar room microphones, we had Neumann 67s. The mic pres I used on the guitars were the [Neve] and in some cases we took a DI. It depended on the song. The acoustic guitar was recorded using a Schoeps CM5U going through a , and the steel guitar using a Neumann U87 going through a and a [Universal Audio] Both mics went through a Neve and an LA2A.

The dual analogue and digital signal paths meant that all the live tracks, which included orchestra, were doubled in the Pro Tools sessions. When stacks of synth parts from Daft Punk themselves were added, many of the sessions ballooned to a huge size. The epic eight-minute track 'Touch', featuring Paul Williams, apparently consisted of different parts; these had to be edited and submixed in Pro Tools because the team were still using an HD3 rig, which only allowed 96 tracks in 96kHz.

As the songs neared completion, many choices were made about what remained in the sessions and what didn't, and once choices had been made as to whether to use the digital or analogue versions of certain parts, the doubled parts would be removed from the session. The important thing was they had that choice for the entire project. Says Franco, "I would have to go back to my notes to work out how much of the analogue and how much of the digital we used, because we did quite a bit of blind comparing between analogue and digital, and so there are many instances where analogue was used without it being marked in the final session.

I know we picked the tape quite a bit, because it sounded so much sweeter. At other times we wanted the punch of digital. The other thing that you have to realise is that we used the UA [converters] when we did the tests in They are great, but they're super-colourful, and don't have the same pristine presence as the Lynx Aurora 16s, which we didn't start using until late — they didn't exist yet in When we listened to the Auroras in , we realised that they sounded better than anything we'd heard until then.

So when using digital, one is dealing with a technology that's still evolving, and very quickly. Finally, in the summer of , Guzauski received a phone call saying that Bangalter and de Homem-Christo considered the recordings finished and were ready for him to mix the album. Mixdown took place over a period of two months at Conway Studio C, the same place where Guzauski had recorded much of the live-musician material.

Guzauski recounts: "They came in with the edited and finished Pro Tools sessions, which were very well organised and cleaned up. Normally I begin a mix by doing some prep work, but in this case there was hardly anything for me to do, as Dan [Lerner] and Peter [Franco] had taken care of that side of things. I was pretty much just the mixer! I had an eight-channel Euphonix Artist controller for this, so I could use faders.

I'd then listen to the whole thing quickly, and then I'd listen to each track, not the whole way through, just to get an idea of what was going on. This was quite straightforward because I'd engineered a lot of what was there. Then I'd get a basic balance and build the mix from the bass, drums, and keyboards, or bass, drums and guitars, whatever the main part of a song was, though I don't normally spend a lot of time working on individual tracks.

Mixing was nothing really fancy, just balancing things with some nice ambience. Processing was purely used to make all the overdubbed parts work together, not to make it brighter or louder. Thomas and Guy-Man would regularly come in and comment, and I'd work on the mix some more.

They had a Pro Tools system set up in the other room, and they'd sometimes go in there to edit things and make more changes. It also was a leisurely process of me setting things up, them listening to it, me tweaking the mix, them maybe doing edits and making other changes in the adjacent room, and me again tweaking things. We had the whole summer to do it!

Also, while the Neve 88R has automation, I was only using analogue outboard, and mix recalls would have been complicated. So we continued mixing each track until they were happy, and then we moved on the next track. The only plug-ins that I used were the UA de-esser, because you can be really precise with them, and gates, because nothing beats gates that can look ahead! Other than that, it was all desk EQ and compression and outboard. We had also used them for tracking and Daft Punk liked them so much that they bought a pair.

It's a three-way system with tweeters and mid-range speakers that are mounted isolated from the woofers, so you can really crank them up without transferring any of the low-frequency vibrations to the other drivers, and this cuts distortion. It made listening to the musicians that much better because these monitors really represent what they are doing. I seem to recall that I used the Zener in the big section on the song 'Touch'.

I didn't use anything on the bass during the mix, other than add some desk EQ in the mid-range to make it cut through. Very occasionally we'd need a little bit more compression, from another LA2A or or the desk. I used the latter mostly for dynamic control, whereas outboard compressors were more used as an effect. Yeah, it's a big bass record! It's the way I heard it. They didn't ask for that, but they didn't say anything against it, either!

I didn't do much to them. With Nile, we just put him up, and to make him fit better in the mix I'd add some 5k on the desk, and that was it. I don't think we used any outboard on him. He simply had his sound and it was great the way it was. On 'Get Lucky', his part was actually made up of two parts. I didn't do any big treatments on Paul Jackson's guitar either.

Because I'd recorded him with different mics, I could simply use another mic if I wanted a different perspective. It was similar with the keyboards and synthesizers: most of these were treated with EQ and compression on the console, just to make it fit in the mix. I used the EMT on the orchestra, but I'd also recorded it with the live chamber at Capitol for natural ambience. In some cases I brought the orchestra out on a stereo bus and compressed it slightly to make sure it kept its place in the track, without me having to mix it too loud.

But in the places where the orchestra can be heard by itself, there was very little processing. I always pay a lot of attention to the vocals, and try to make sure that they sound natural and have really good diction, so I usually add some top end to make sure they cut through. But I tend to cut around kHz, very narrowly and depending on the vocals, and use the Dbx de-esser so I can make the vocal brighter without it being sibilant.

Regarding Daft Punk's vocoder parts, what they called the robot vocals, they wanted them to sound as human and soulful as possible. This required quite a bit of compression and desk EQ to keep the diction and make them understandable, and once we had done that, we had to do some narrow-band cuts because some frequencies really stuck out. The compressor I used on them was the I think this is one of the things that makes this record sound so good.

Sometimes we ran things through a piece of gear without it actually doing anything, just to get the sound of the transformers and amplifier. We spent some time auditioning compressors, like several s, LA2As and Neve s, and used what individual piece of gear sounded best to us. Daft Punk actually bought a vintage reconditioned and it didn't quite sound the same, so they traded the one that they had spent a ton of money on for the that they had at Conway, because everybody loved that one!

This is one of the fun things about analogue gear, every individual piece sounds a little different. Although relatively little processing was employed, the actual mixdown process for each song was astonishingly elaborate. They were all Ampex recorders, with the machine running at 15ips having custom Aria electronics. For some songs we liked the 15ips master better, because it had more saturation and the transients were more rounded off.

But most of the album came from one of the 30ips masters, which both had stock Ampex electronics, but one had the Flux head and the other had the regular head. He and Guy-Man were also very meticulous about the alignment of these machines: a tech at Conway checked the playback every day and aligned the recording for every reel of tape, just to make sure there were no differences in the tape stock.

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Moroder stated:. So I came to Paris in the studio and he had three microphones to record me, they were different microphones, and I said 'Why do you have three? Is not one enough? Then, if your going to talk about the '70, you have the second microphone'. And then I asked the sound engineer, 'Is anybody ever, be able to distinguish the different sounds?

On Feburary 26, , Daft Punk updated their website with a new image, confirming a new album and collaboration with Columbia records. On April 11, , Daft Punk played a teaser for their 4th album at Coachella, confirming that Panda Bear, Julian Casablancas, Pharrell, and others are working on the album. On April 13th, A minute long teaser aired during SNL. Similiar to the Coachella teaser. On April 19th, The following is the tracklist presented in the standard edition of the album, released worldwide.

With the exception of the Japanese version, which included a new exclusive track, Horizon. Many speculated that Daft Punk would probably release their new album on Sep. Some rumors after Electroma 's Opening Night in Paris said that Daft Punk would start recording a new album after their tour. On May 28, , Busy P , former manager of Daft Punk, revealed that Daft Punk were currently in the studio, but it was later mentioned that Daft Punk disliked all of the material they had initially put together and scrapped all of the work.

The supposed song was later revealed to be "a little joke" from the editors, disappointing many fans, and ending the hype. On 26 February , Daft Punk's official website and Facebook page announced the signing to Columbia with a picture of the duo's helmets, and a "Columbia" logo in the corner. On 2 March, a second television ad aired during Saturday Night Live SNL depicting an animated, stylized version of the band's logo and the aforementioned image of the helmets.

The first single from the album, " Get Lucky " was released on April 19th, , on iTunes and Amazon. American musician, singer, songwriter, and frontman of The Strokes. Daft Wiki Explore. Daft Punk. Alive Alive Musique Vol. Interstella Electroma Tron: Legacy. Live Daftendirektour Alive Alive Explore Wikis Community Central.

Register Don't have an account? Random Access Memories. View source. History Talk 0. Do you like this video? Play Sound. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 13 April Tron: Legacy' s orchestral score reveals a new side of Daft Punk. Pop Matters. Retrieved on 7 April Retrieved on 7 May In The Mix. Retrieved on 30 March Chic: Interview with Nile Rodgers. Faster Louder. Retrieved on 31 March Pitchfork Media. Retrieved on 5 April Retrieved on 18 April URB Magazine 25 May Retrieved on 10 February Retrieved on 16 May Retrieved on 28 April Field Day Festival 2 June Archived from the original on 25 September Chilly Gonzales: "Je suis un homme de mon temps" French.

La Depeche. Retrieved on 15 April Daft Punk Produce New N. Retrieved on 21 May Columbia Records , a division of Sony Music Entertainment. Cover Story: Daft Punk. Retrieved on 14 May Daft Punk: Cover Story Outtakes. Retrieved on 15 May Playing at Our House".

GQ 83 5 : 76— Retrieved on May 5, After these initial try-out and demoing sessions, Bangalter and de Homem-Christo spent two years on another project: writing and recording the soundtrack for the Disney movie Tron: Legacy. They worked both with synths and a full-size orchestra, an experience which is likely to have alerted them to the benefits of working with live musicians.

Around the time of the soundtrack's release, the French duo returned to working on what was to become Random Access Memories. During their time working on Tron: Legacy, Bangalter and de Homem-Christo's vision for the new album had become clearer, and it was during this period that they had taken the decision to work with the top musicians who had played on the classic '70s and early '80s albums that were their reference points.

Bangalter explained that live musicians offer "an infinity of nuance, in the shuffles and the grooves. These things are impossible to create with machines. We began with listening to and editing their demos, with help from [Pro Tools engineer] Dan Lerner, to get them ready for overdubbing. We also wanted to mentally prepare ourselves for this huge undertaking of tracking master session musicians at Conway with a master engineer like Mick Guzauski.

Guy-Man and Thomas also brought their modular synth over from Paris. They built it out of various bits of custom pieces that were made for them to their specifications by various different modular synth engineers, including Modcan. Most of the modular stuff was recorded in Paris, but a small percentage of it was recorded in LA.

Some of the synth parts were recorded via DI, at other times they went via guitar amplifiers. The modular synth is a large part of the sound of the album, almost all of the synth sounds that you hear are made by it, and also many of the drum sounds. The synth and drum sounds on 'Doing' It Right', for example, were created using the modular synth, which also has the capability to store patterns.

To mainly use this piece of gear was another very deliberate decision that they made. It's almost a lost art form to create sounds on an analogue synthesizer using LFOs and envelope filters and analogue delays and so on. I would look at their signal paths and be totally amazed at the sounds they managed to create. For them, the synths they had used for making the demos in were really simple and easy.

The next stage took place at Conway Studio C in Los Angeles, to which the team invited crack session musicians including bassists Nathan East and James Genus, drummers Omar Hakim and John Robertson and keyboardist Chris Caswell, who also responsible for many of the album's orchestrations and arrangements. In addition, Mick Guzauski came over from New York to track all the live musicians recorded in Los Angeles, and he later mixed the entire album.

They also did not want me to use any plug-ins, and they wanted me to record to both analogue and digital. They came in with their song demos as Pro Tools sessions, and some songs were more completely conceived and had programmed drums, bass and keyboards, and in other cases it were more rough ideas with a click. They also brought their own synths into the studio, with a modular synth and things like an Oberheim OB8 and a Juno and quite a few old polyphonic analogue synths.

At this stage, it was more a matter of having the musicians play to different ideas and grooves, which Thomas and Guy-Man then later edited and created songs structures from. They had very specific ideas about what the musicians should play, so they would get the parts that they wanted, but at the same time they allowed the musicians the freedom to improvise.

We recorded a lot of stuff, and they then took the best bits and created their masterpiece from that! They were a matter of 'we have this vibe and chord progression here,' and then Guy-Man and Thomas would explain what they wanted to hear. The musicians would have a listen and went in and did their thing. Guy-Man and Thomas really wanted to capture great live performances, so we strove to let the guys play the stuff the way they felt it, and we'd often just let the tape roll, really allowing the musicians to run free and put their hearts and soul into these ideas.

It was an incredible experience to hear these musicians, who have played on many of the albums that we love, do their thing. We'd then load the material that was recorded on analogue tape into Pro Tools, which was running at 96k, where it sat side-by-side with the same digitally recorded material, and then later on we spent a lot of time listening to everything and picking the best bits and editing them and fitting them in. This happened every time after things were added, whether the rhythm section, the orchestra, or the vocals.

The ability to edit is the great thing about Pro Tools, and this is where Dan Lerner and later David Channing really came into their own. David is a wizard when it comes to editing large amounts of tracks and making them groove together. Vibe and groove were a large part of the focus during the tracking sessions, but as ever with RAM, an extraordinarily amount of time and attention went into making sure that things sounded the way Bangalter and de Homem-Christo envisioned.

I used very little EQ while tracking, and also during mixing. We did not want the album to sound EQ'ed. We wanted it to sound as natural as possible. It's the old way of doing it, using EQ just to touch things up, and not doing anything drastic. Our choices made subtle differences, with API mic pres sounding nice and punchy and being great for the kick and snare, while Neve mic pres are a little bit more airy and worked well for the overheads and drums.

The other thing was that they in most cases wanted to suppress the room sound. They wanted that '70s drum sound, recorded in studios which were wall-to-wall carpeted and which were therefore very dead at the top end. Today's studios aren't like that at all. We still got a little bit of room sound in, and this actually added a nice sparkle to the sound and modernised it a little bit.

Peter Franco first worked with Daft Punk on their hugely influential world tour. Rather than drastically EQ'ing the kick drum in the mix, I wanted to have different perspectives on it. The D has a nice, solid, low bottom and a punchy mid-range. The C has a very defined top and a fairly tight low end, and picks up more of the beater. The 47 has more low end and less attack, and I used the sub for when I wanted some really low bottom end. The kick drum was the only drum on which I used so many mics.

As I mentioned, the room mics didn't really play a part, but I did have Neumann U67s set up, just in case. I used the Neve 88R remote mic pres on the toms and overheads. During the mix, the U67 was in the centre and the DPAs were panned left and right. SR came in during the late '80s, and it suppresses the really high transients a little bit, but it also fattens the bottom end, which were the characteristics that we wanted.

We also used an Antelope digital clock. The analogue tape was striped with SMPTE, so it could run in sync with Pro Tools, and after the recordings we'd transferred the tape material back into the same session in Pro Tools, so we ended up with two identical versions of the same material in each session. The first 23 tracks would have been directly recorded into Pro Tools, and right underneath that were the exact same 23 tracks, but originating from the analogue tape.

We could not keep the analogue material in analogue, because Thomas and Guy-Man needed to be able to extensively edit everything. During the next one and a half years, work on Random Access Memories progressed according to the same pattern, with Guzauski recording live musicians in studios in Los Angeles, while a few other sessions with live musicians, including Nile Rodgers, took place in Electric Lady Studios in New York.

The rest of the recordings were done at Gang Recording studios in Paris, and engineered by Florian Lagatta. The vocalists — septuagenarian crooner Paul Williams, Pharrell Williams, Todd Edwards, the Strokes' Julian Casablancas, Panda Bear and Giorgio Moroder who talked rather than sang — were also recorded in these locations, although Daft Punk recorded most of their own vocodered robot vocals in their own studio in Paris.

After the Conway sessions, we went over to Capitol Studios to record the orchestra, and a few months later I went out to Los Angeles again, and recorded Paul Jackson's guitars and Greg Leisz's steel guitar, and Chris did more keyboard overdubs, all at Henson. We later tracked more bass and drums at Conway. I also recorded a percussionist called Quinn, who was incredible. He filled out most of Conway Studio C, which is a fairly large room, probably between 25 and 30 feet wide and at least 40 feet long, and with two really good-sized iso booths.

He had home-made drum kits with a unique sound, all sorts of stuff that was made by him and made incredible sounds. There's a moveable wall, and we had a piece orchestra in Studio A, which I recorded with a Decca Tree with three [Neumann] M50 mics, and spot mics on the instruments, and I also had percussion and timpani in the same room. In Studio B, we had the brass section and the woodwind section.

We'd record the strings at the same time as either the brass or the woodwinds in the other studio, and then the percussion in Studio A with whatever we hadn't recorded of the woodwinds and brass in Studio B, so I had isolation between these four orchestral sections. I had three different mics on the guitar cab, the SM57, Royer and U We would listen to them and then decide which ones we liked best. For guitar room microphones, we had Neumann 67s.

The mic pres I used on the guitars were the [Neve] and in some cases we took a DI. It depended on the song. The acoustic guitar was recorded using a Schoeps CM5U going through a , and the steel guitar using a Neumann U87 going through a and a [Universal Audio] Both mics went through a Neve and an LA2A. The dual analogue and digital signal paths meant that all the live tracks, which included orchestra, were doubled in the Pro Tools sessions.

When stacks of synth parts from Daft Punk themselves were added, many of the sessions ballooned to a huge size. The epic eight-minute track 'Touch', featuring Paul Williams, apparently consisted of different parts; these had to be edited and submixed in Pro Tools because the team were still using an HD3 rig, which only allowed 96 tracks in 96kHz.

As the songs neared completion, many choices were made about what remained in the sessions and what didn't, and once choices had been made as to whether to use the digital or analogue versions of certain parts, the doubled parts would be removed from the session. The important thing was they had that choice for the entire project. Says Franco, "I would have to go back to my notes to work out how much of the analogue and how much of the digital we used, because we did quite a bit of blind comparing between analogue and digital, and so there are many instances where analogue was used without it being marked in the final session.

I know we picked the tape quite a bit, because it sounded so much sweeter. At other times we wanted the punch of digital. The other thing that you have to realise is that we used the UA [converters] when we did the tests in They are great, but they're super-colourful, and don't have the same pristine presence as the Lynx Aurora 16s, which we didn't start using until late — they didn't exist yet in When we listened to the Auroras in , we realised that they sounded better than anything we'd heard until then.

So when using digital, one is dealing with a technology that's still evolving, and very quickly. Finally, in the summer of , Guzauski received a phone call saying that Bangalter and de Homem-Christo considered the recordings finished and were ready for him to mix the album. Mixdown took place over a period of two months at Conway Studio C, the same place where Guzauski had recorded much of the live-musician material.

Guzauski recounts: "They came in with the edited and finished Pro Tools sessions, which were very well organised and cleaned up. Normally I begin a mix by doing some prep work, but in this case there was hardly anything for me to do, as Dan [Lerner] and Peter [Franco] had taken care of that side of things. I was pretty much just the mixer! I had an eight-channel Euphonix Artist controller for this, so I could use faders.

I'd then listen to the whole thing quickly, and then I'd listen to each track, not the whole way through, just to get an idea of what was going on. This was quite straightforward because I'd engineered a lot of what was there. Then I'd get a basic balance and build the mix from the bass, drums, and keyboards, or bass, drums and guitars, whatever the main part of a song was, though I don't normally spend a lot of time working on individual tracks.

Mixing was nothing really fancy, just balancing things with some nice ambience. Processing was purely used to make all the overdubbed parts work together, not to make it brighter or louder. Thomas and Guy-Man would regularly come in and comment, and I'd work on the mix some more. They had a Pro Tools system set up in the other room, and they'd sometimes go in there to edit things and make more changes. It also was a leisurely process of me setting things up, them listening to it, me tweaking the mix, them maybe doing edits and making other changes in the adjacent room, and me again tweaking things.

We had the whole summer to do it! Also, while the Neve 88R has automation, I was only using analogue outboard, and mix recalls would have been complicated. So we continued mixing each track until they were happy, and then we moved on the next track. The only plug-ins that I used were the UA de-esser, because you can be really precise with them, and gates, because nothing beats gates that can look ahead!

Other than that, it was all desk EQ and compression and outboard. We had also used them for tracking and Daft Punk liked them so much that they bought a pair. It's a three-way system with tweeters and mid-range speakers that are mounted isolated from the woofers, so you can really crank them up without transferring any of the low-frequency vibrations to the other drivers, and this cuts distortion.

It made listening to the musicians that much better because these monitors really represent what they are doing. I seem to recall that I used the Zener in the big section on the song 'Touch'. I didn't use anything on the bass during the mix, other than add some desk EQ in the mid-range to make it cut through. Very occasionally we'd need a little bit more compression, from another LA2A or or the desk. I used the latter mostly for dynamic control, whereas outboard compressors were more used as an effect.

Yeah, it's a big bass record! It's the way I heard it. They didn't ask for that, but they didn't say anything against it, either! I didn't do much to them.

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